Visionary – Steve Jobs and now Elon Musk

This entry doesn't immediately seem to fit into this blog, because what it's about doesn't immediately fit with what this story is about. But, it is. Why? Because what I'm about is the minimizing the differences between myself, and someone who hasn't suffered an injury that's rendered them unable to drive. Put it this way, with what Elon is thinking, while the notion of my being able get into a Tesla is highly-unlikely (simply because of cost), the concept of taking one alone is impossible. However, with what he's proposing, not only will riding in one be possible, but doing so alone.
Teslas, are cooler than pretty much anything, of that there's no doubt, but they're not cheap! But, as with everything, while the price starts high, as skills/production/everything else improves, the cost to make will reduce.
Visionaries don't see the cost of making things, nor do they worry about "little things" that would get in the way, because all they see is the result.
Everything that's designed follows a 3-step process of questions, which is "what do we need?", followed by "how do we do it". At the centre is why it's being thought of. Nearly every invention follows the process, starting at the outside, and working in. Steve Jobs, who invented the Mac computers, followed it, but reversed the order. He thought of why what he's inventing is needed. He solved it, and worked out.
Elon Musk is a visionary, of that there's no doubt, because he's making going to space more of a common-thing, and now he's announced that he'll be into making self-driving taxis.
I'm looking at my computer, the where I store my info for backup, and this will show more of what I just said.
Everything that's somewhat standard now was "holy cow, that's awesome!!" when it was first launched, and cost a fortune. In a long time, cars like this will likely simply be "just a car", and the fact that it's driverless, and a taxi, won't be anything weird.

Questions you might be wondering

If you knew me pre-crash, you’ve undoubtedly noticed that I’m a bit different (if you haven’t, is everything ok with you??). But seriously, things have changed, but when you see me, you’re likely wondering how the brain injury shows itself. That’s the interesting/scary aspect of a brain injury, because it’s more-often-than-not, invisible. I’ve cursed myself in the past, for what I’d lost (the week before the crash, I did a triathlon, the month before I biked to Kingston, and so on), but I’ve paid attention in the last few years, and realized something. What that is is that while being visibly-disabled is an obstacle, it’s vastly superior to what many people who’ve suffered one have.

And, from doing a search online, it’s clear that there’s a vast number of invisible-sufferers.

If you’ve a question, not just about my disability, I’ll try to address it. I’m planning a bi-monthly release, but I’m hoping to increase it to something like bi-weekly, or more.

Today will be awesome

Ok, I’ve been told that I over-use the word “awesome”. I’ve looked at my previous posts, and they’re right. I use it a lot. But, it’s with a good reason – because of my brain injury, I swing from very-high, to very-low, thinking of myself. The bad is bad, to the scare me in hindsight. But, I don’t see it, nor do I recognize it when it’s happening. After, when I’m in a better place, I look at myself, and sad. So, when I’m not down, I’m up, and I’m going to “push” myself to do good stuff, mostly on here! I’m working to make the website even more awesome than it is now, by building relationships with “real pros.” I built where this is now, with the awesome pics taken by Dan Ragall.

 

Where am I now? I’m working to make my blog more automated, by auto-publishing posts in the future. I’ve written 4 months now, but it was manual-posting. Today, I found a plugin to do it, and this is the first! I’ve scheduled it to post ahead, and we’ll see if it works!

We’re adjusting to our new normal

She’s been to the top of the world, done a whole lot of things that are mind-boggling, but when a skier slammed into her in Gatineau Park while cross-country skiing, her world changed.   Her injury was pretty much the epitome of invisibility, because unless you know, you’d never know what she’d suffered.
She didn’t know what to do, and wasn’t given proper guidance, so she went on a boat on the Drake Passage, home to some of the largest waves in the world.  The waves were immense, people were thrown everywhere, and because she hadn’t received proper guidance, her invisible injury was made worse.
Last summer she was still vomiting frequently.  She’s an “invisible sufferer”, because unless you know, you’d have absolutely no idea of what she suffers, and if she makes a mistake because of it, she might be blamed for inattentiveness.

Click to read the story!

 

It’s accessible, but is it?

I posted someone else’s story, about the not-quite-accessible status of places she goes.  I’d said that I agree, that while I’m able to walk when needed, but achieving the minimum level of accessibility to be “certified”, and get the tax-break, without making it truly accessible, is wrong.

With how my disability is, I’m able to look upon my scooter as a car.  I don’t go into stores, usually because I can’t.  I bring a walker with me.  You see it on the back.

I follow all traffic rules, stopping at stop signs and the like, because “they” require me to park it like a car when I get to some stores.

Here’s an example.  This is an “accessible” store.   This is its front entrance.  My scooter is roughly 8 feet long. The door to the wall is roughly 3.5 feet, with a 90 degree turn, in a space roughly 3 feet wide.

This isn’t the only one, not even close, which why I’m not going to say their name.   They know that because they’re only a tenant, that they’re unable to do too much, but they try really damn hard.