Today’s a new day for my posts!

Donna said something yesterday, that kinda made me <sigh>.  She’d said that I should do blog-posts, as opposed to simply posting on Facebook, because they’re basically the same thing, but the blog is the “best place” to write them.  The reason that I’d sigh’d was that it wasn’t the first time she’d said that.

This morning I remembered that, and made the decision that that will be the last time that she asks me that.  I’m going to write here, on BrainSTRONG’s blog, and circulate it.  I’m not sure what I’ll write, but I’m thinking, and I never actually-planned my social media posts, so the only difference is that it’ll be on the blog (first) and then circulated.  However, it’ll be superior because with an auto-posting plug-in, it’ll distribute pretty much everywhere, right away!

ABI vs. TBI

ABI vs. TBI
What’s the Difference?

Acquired Brain Injury (ABI)

The position of the Brain Injury Network is that acquired brain injury (ABI) includes traumatic brain injuries (TBI’s), strokes, brain illness, and any other kind of brain injury acquired after birth. However, ABI does not include what are classified as degenerative brain conditions such as Alzheimer’s Disease or Parkinson’s Disease.

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI)

“A traumatically induced structural injury and/or physiological disruption of brain function as a result of an external force that is indicated by new onset or worsening of at least one of the following clinical signs, immediately following the event:

  • Any period of loss of or a decreased level of consciousness;
  • Any loss of memory for events immediately before or after the injury;
  • Any alternation in mental state at the time of the injury (confusion, disorientation, slowed thinking, etc.);
  • Neurological deficits (weakness, loss of balance,  change in vision, praxis, paresis/plegia, sensory loss, aphasia, etc.) that may or may not be transient;
  • Intracranial lesion.
  • External forces may include any of the following events: the head being struck by an object, the head striking an object, the brain undergoing an acceleration/deceleration movement without direct external trauma to the head, a foreign body penetrating the brain forces generated from events such as a blast or explosion, or other force yet to be defined.”

Birth Trauma and Brain Injury

There is one subject regarding forms of TBI that is the source of some disagreement and that is with regard to the subject of brain injury produced by birth trauma. Generally speaking, brain trauma produced by the process of birth has been specifically excluded from being classified as a form of TBI by medical definitions. However, there are many mothers of babies being born with these birth brain injuries who are upset by that exclusion.

They see birth complications that result in these brain injuries as being forms of TBI. Some of these mothers see their children as being survivors of TBI, and they do not like that their children are excluded from this category.

Click the logo to read what does the OBIA (Ontario Brain Injury Association) say about the difference?

Types of facilities for long-term health

Long-term care is provided in different places by different caregivers, depending on a person's needs. Most long-term care is provided at home by unpaid family members and friends. It can also be given in a facility such as a nursing home or in the community, for example, in an adult day care center.
For the most part, and more often than not, people who'd consider "unsupported living" remain at home for as long as they can. A decline of their self-support skills would necessitate the move into a long-term facility. Basically, they need some help with what's done every day.
Independent Living Apartments
Independent living apartments are ideal for seniors who do not need personal or medical care but who would like to live with other seniors who share similar interests. In most independent living facilities seniors can take advantage of planned community events, field trips, shopping excursions and on-premise projects.
Adult Homes
Adult homes are licensed and regulated for temporary or long-term residence by adults unable to live independently. They usually include supervision, personal care, housekeeping, and three meals a day.
Assisted Living Program (ALP)
An excellent alternative to nursing homes for seniors who need help with their daily routines, but who do not need 24-hour care. Room, board, case management, and skilled nursing services come from an outside agency.
Nursing Home (Skilled Nursing Facility)
Nursing homes offer 24-hour-a-day care for those who can no longer live independently. In nursing homes, trained medical professionals provide specialized care to seniors with severe illnesses or injuries. Specially trained staff assist residents with daily activities such as bathing, eating, laundry and housekeeping. They may specialize in short-term or acute nursing care, intermediate care or long-term skilled nursing care.
What it comes down to is that whatever you need, is available. The more that you'd get, the more that it will cost. If you want to be happy, and not worried about the cost, trust me, you'll find something.

Visionary – Steve Jobs and now Elon Musk

This entry doesn't immediately seem to fit into this blog, because what it's about doesn't immediately fit with what this story is about. But, it is. Why? Because what I'm about is the minimizing the differences between myself, and someone who hasn't suffered an injury that's rendered them unable to drive. Put it this way, with what Elon is thinking, while the notion of my being able get into a Tesla is highly-unlikely (simply because of cost), the concept of taking one alone is impossible. However, with what he's proposing, not only will riding in one be possible, but doing so alone.
Teslas, are cooler than pretty much anything, of that there's no doubt, but they're not cheap! But, as with everything, while the price starts high, as skills/production/everything else improves, the cost to make will reduce.
Visionaries don't see the cost of making things, nor do they worry about "little things" that would get in the way, because all they see is the result.
Everything that's designed follows a 3-step process of questions, which is "what do we need?", followed by "how do we do it". At the centre is why it's being thought of. Nearly every invention follows the process, starting at the outside, and working in. Steve Jobs, who invented the Mac computers, followed it, but reversed the order. He thought of why what he's inventing is needed. He solved it, and worked out.
Elon Musk is a visionary, of that there's no doubt, because he's making going to space more of a common-thing, and now he's announced that he'll be into making self-driving taxis.
I'm looking at my computer, the where I store my info for backup, and this will show more of what I just said.
Everything that's somewhat standard now was "holy cow, that's awesome!!" when it was first launched, and cost a fortune. In a long time, cars like this will likely simply be "just a car", and the fact that it's driverless, and a taxi, won't be anything weird.

This is summary information as best we can find

Concussion

The most common type of traumatic brain injury is called a Concussion. The word comes from the Latin concutere, which means “to shake violently.”

According to the CDC, in the US, between 2001 and 2009, an estimated 173,285 people under age 19 were treated in hospital emergency rooms for concussions related to sports and recreation activities.

Other causes include car and bicycle accidents, work-related injuries, falls, and fighting.

WHAT IS A CONCUSSION?

As seen in countless Saturday morning cartoons, a concussion is most often caused by a sudden direct blow or bump to the head.

The brain is made of soft tissue. It’s cushioned by spinal fluid and encased in the protective shell of the skull. When you sustain a concussion, the impact can jolt your brain. Sometimes, it literally causes it to move around in your head. Traumatic brain injuries can cause bruising, damage to the blood vessels, and injury to the nerves.

The result? Your brain doesn’t function normally. If you’ve suffered a concussion, vision may be disturbed, you may lose equilibrium, or you may fall unconscious. In short, the brain is confused. That’s why Bugs Bunny often saw stars.

WHAT ARE THE SIGNS OF A CONCUSSION?

Concussions can be tricky to diagnose. Though you may have a visible cut or bruise on your head, you can’t actually see a concussion. Signs may not appear for days or weeks after the injury. Some symptoms last for just seconds; others may linger.

Concussions are fairly common. Some estimates say a mild brain trauma is sustained every 21 seconds in the U.S. But it’s important to recognize the signs of a concussion so you can take the proper steps to treat the injury.

There are some common physical, mental, and emotional symptoms a person may display following a concussion. Any of these could be a sign of traumatic brain injury: