Take hits to the head seriously

The president of the US knocked NFL on rules: ‘Concussions — ‘Uh oh, got a little ding on the head?' in 2016, and calling the rules “soft”.
While he's wrong, he's not alone in thinking that way. The reason for that is that if someone hasn't had an injury, or knows someone who has, they don't understand.
While concussions are sometimes invisible to the eye, the effects aren't.
I've got plenty of challenges, of that there's no doubt, but the fact that I'm visibly-disabled is a plus. Why? Because if I stop for a few seconds, and do something that isn't simply moving forward, someone usually stops, and asks me if I'd like some help.
What I don't understand is that some doctors consider traumatic brain injury and concussion as two separate diagnostic categories, when in truth, both reflect brain injury.
When people go to the hospital, after getting hit on the head, what's weird (wrong) is that concussion is sometimes termed, over "brain injury." The reason for that is strongly associated with earlier discharge from the hospital and earlier return to school activities, the researchers say.
But, with the reality that they're the same, and post-crash effects can appear later, researchers recommend that more specific descriptions of concussion and brain injury should be used. The reason for that is that a more detailed explanation can include elements that would warn of the potential occurrences of issues.
Using the term “mild traumatic brain injury” rather than “concussion” might help people better understand what they are dealing with and improve decisions about what the children should be allowed to do.